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Highmore [née Hiller], Susanna

First Name: 
Susanna
Last Name: 
Highmore [née Hiller]
Sex: 
Female
Birth: 
1689
Death: 
1750
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
NULL
Education: 
NULL
Politics: 
NULL
Milieux: 
Domestic/coterie MS circulation; Clerical religious writing [though not a cleric obvi]
Patrons: 
NULL
Coteries: 
Isaac Watts; James Foster; James Harris; Isaac Hawkins Browne; William Duncombe; Samuel Richardson
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
sonnet ‘A Calvinistical Reflection’ in GM 1749
Summing Up: 

Highmore's primary occupation was that of a wife and mother. She seems to have composed verses at home, and the DNB explains that "Religious conviction led the conventionally modest Highmore to write publicly." She published a few short, witty occasional poems, but none are noted in the ESTC/ECCO. The DNB contends that she must have written more in MS form.

Higgons, Bevil [Bevill in ESTC/ECCO]

First Name: 
Bevil [Bevill in ESTC/ECCO]
Last Name: 
Higgons
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1670
Death: 
1736
Nationality: 
English?
Religion: 
NULL
Education: 
matriculated as a commoner from St John's College, Oxford 1686; migrated to Trinity Hall, Cambridge as fellow commoner; admitted as a student of the Middle Temple 1687, but not called to the bar
Politics: 
Jacobite [heavily involved in the Fenwick plot in 1696 and other Jacobite activities]
Milieux: 
Tory/Jacobite satire and political commentary; Playwriting
Patrons: 
NULL
Coteries: 
NULL
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
English verse addressed the Queen on the birth of James Stuart [James III] in the university collection of congratulatory poems Illustrissimi principis ducis Cornubiae … Genethliacon (1688); poems in Dryden's Examen poeticum (1693); contributed to Elijah Fenton's Poems on Several Occasions (1717);
Summing Up: 

Higgons committed much of his life to the Jacobite cause. He wrote histories and some occasional poems. While in England he wrote in defense of the Stuarts.

Hiffernan, Paul

First Name: 
Paul
Last Name: 
Hiffernan
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1719
Death: 
1777
Nationality: 
Irish
Religion: 
Catholic
Education: 
grammar school; Dublin Catholic seminary; University of Montpellier (France), degree in medicine
Politics: 
NULL
Milieux: 
Playwriting
Patrons: 
David Garrick -- a rocky relationship, but Garrick produced one performance of The National Prejudice for Hiffernan in 1768 and helped raise subscriptions for Hiffernan's Dramatic Genius
Coteries: 
NULL
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
attack on the popular opposition candidate Charles Lucas in The Tickler, ed. Hiffernan 1748-49 (P1644); The Tuner, letters 1-5, addressed To Eugenius 1754-55 (P2831)
Summing Up: 

Hiffernan epitomizes the shady moralless hack type. He seemed to dabble in a little of everything as a writer. He wrote plays, poetry, Latin verse, periodicals, translations, and worked as a "pamphleteer and paragraph writer". He only ever achieved moderate success at best. The DNB explains, he kept "the friends on whom he sponged through dining, subscription collecting, hawking his books, and occasional blackmail. He wrote only when reduced by absolute necessity." Towards the end of his life, he relied on the charity of Foote, Garrick, and others to survive.

Heywood, James

First Name: 
James
Last Name: 
Heywood
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1687
Death: 
1776
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
NULL
Education: 
Manchester grammar school
Politics: 
NULL
Milieux: 
NULL
Patrons: 
NULL
Coteries: 
NULL
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
contributed to The Freethinker; contributed to The Plain-Dealer; a letter in no. 268 of The Spectator
Summing Up: 

Heywood was a politician and writer, but little is known about his life. He collected and published a volume of his poems. He also contributed to some periodicals.

Hervey, second Baron Hervey of Ickworth, John

First Name: 
John
Last Name: 
Hervey, second Baron Hervey of Ickworth
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1696
Death: 
1743
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
NULL
Education: 
private tutors at Ickworth due to poor health; Westminster School 1712; Clare College, Cambridge 1713; MA 1715;
Politics: 
Whig (staunch supporter of Robert Walpole)
Milieux: 
University wit and Latinity; Whig satire and political writing
Patrons: 
NULL
Coteries: 
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (very close friends); Robert Walpole (essentially controlled Hervey's political career); Queen Caroline; made enemies of William Pulteney, Frederick Louis, Prince of Wales, and Alexander Pope;
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
NULL
Summing Up: 

An important government official, Hervey was known for his staunch court whig politics and support of Robert Walpole. His politics, as well as his scandalous personal life (he was bisexual and rumored to have had affairs with Lady Mary, Princess Caroline, Francisco Algarotti, and Prince Frederick), were ammunition for Pope's scathing satire. In his poem "Verses address'd to the imitator of Horace", Hervey attempted to attack Pope back, though Hervey's poetical skills were admittedly lesser. Politics often features in both his prose and poetic works.

Henley [known as Orator Henley], John

First Name: 
John
Last Name: 
Henley [known as Orator Henley]
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1692
Death: 
1756
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
Dissenter [openly separated from the Church of England 1725, registered himself as a dissenter]
Education: 
local free school at Melton Mowbray; Oakham School; awarded a place and an exhibition of 40s. a year at St John's College, Cambridge, admitted as a pensioner 1709; BA 1712
Politics: 
Whig [more for ambition, rather than political ideology]
Milieux: 
Clerical religious writing; writing for London booksellers; whig satire and political writing
Patrons: 
the lord chancellor, the earl of Macclesfield until 1725
Coteries: 
NULL
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
two letters to The Spectator (nos. 396 and 518) and "a not altogether worthless poem," ‘On a LADY that could not Help Laughing at Nothing,’ later printed by Curll in 1719; began the Hyp Doctor, a weekly newspaper (2d.) in opposition to the tory The Craftsman under pseud. Sir Isaac Ratcliffe 1730-41; The Oratory magazine, edited and chiefly written by Henley 1748
Summing Up: 

"Orator" Henley exemplifies the hack writer and ambitious clergyman paradigms. When he first arrived in London, he met Curll, for whom Henley produced typical Grub Street hack work between 1720 and 1725, including his "compleat linguist". Henley also became a spy in Robert Walpole's secret service, joining the whigs more to satisfy his ambitions than for ideological purposes. However, he was unable to achieve his goal of living in City decadence this way, so he broke from the Anglican Church and became a dissenter.

Haywood [née Fowler], Eliza

First Name: 
Eliza
Last Name: 
Haywood [née Fowler]
Sex: 
Female
Birth: 
1693
Death: 
1756
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
NULL
Education: 
NULL
Politics: 
NULL
Milieux: 
Playwriting; writing for London booksellers
Patrons: 
NULL
Coteries: 
NULL
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
The Tea-table, written and edited by Eliza Haywood; The Parrot, by pseud. Mrs. Prattle (by Eliza Heywood and others), 1728; The Female Spectator, written and edited by Haywood, began 1744; The Lady’s weekly magazine, pseud. Mrs. Penelope Pry, 1747
Summing Up: 

Haywood was incredibly prolific, writing poetry throughout her life, in addition to plays, translations, and journalistic pieces. However, she is best remembered for her prose fictions, which are considered forerunners to the novel. Financially distressed in the 1720s, some plays were acted for her benefit. She was an actress for a while, and she also started some Female periodicals. It seems that writing was her sole form of income for most of her life.

Hay, William

First Name: 
William
Last Name: 
Hay
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1695
Death: 
1755
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
NULL
Education: 
school in the village of Newick, in Sussex 1705; grammar school at Lewes; Christ Church, Oxford 1712-15, no degree; Lincoln's Inn 1714; Middle Temple 1715, where he kept rooms until his death, though no evidence of his being a lawyer;
Politics: 
Whig (supporter of Walpole and the Pelhams)
Milieux: 
Whig satire/political writing [less so satire]
Patrons: 
NULL
Coteries: 
NULL
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
NULL
Summing Up: 

Hay was an active whig politician, member of parliament, placeman, and a pensioner. He wrote on religious and political subjects. He wrote only one original poem, Mount Caburn, in his lifetime. His most popular work was Deformity: an essay, a discussion of his own physical deformity.

Hawkesworth, John

First Name: 
John
Last Name: 
Hawkesworth
Sex: 
Male
Death: 
1773
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
raised Dissenter
Education: 
elementary education in writing, arithmetic, English; often looked down upon for his lack of learning
Politics: 
NULL
Milieux: 
Playwriting
Patrons: 
NULL
Coteries: 
SJ until 1756, when SJ felt that success had gone to his head; Johnson's Ivy Lane Club; David Garrick; Benjamin Franklin; Irish baronet Sir James Caldwell; Charles Burney
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
verse fable ‘The Fop, Cock and Diamond’ in GM, 1741 (composed 1740); other fables in GM 1741-2; editor and principal writer for The Adventurer 1752-4, successor to Johnson's Rambler;
Summing Up: 

Hawkesworth was a writer who prospered thanks to his many connections, many of which he breached, however, as a result of his perceived vanity and greed. His first poem, unpublished, was composed in 1738, but his verses printed in GM established his literary reputation. From there he went on to publish several compilations, prose works, and dramatic pieces. His final publication, 'An account,' received a great deal of acrid criticism, which is supposed to have contributed to his death. His most popular literary work was Almoran and Hamet: an Oriental Tale.

Havard [Harvard, Haverd], William

First Name: 
William
Last Name: 
Havard [Harvard, Haverd]
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1710
Death: 
1778
Nationality: 
Irish
Religion: 
NULL
Education: 
NULL
Politics: 
NULL
Milieux: 
Playwriting
Patrons: 
NULL
Coteries: 
David Garrick
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
London Chronicle ('Ode to the Memory of Shakespeare’) 1757
Summing Up: 

Havard was a popular, respected (though not sensational) actor, primarily playing minor and supporting roles throughout his career. He also achieved minor success as a playwright and poet; his most popular play was King Charles I.

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