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Kelly, John

First Name: 
John
Last Name: 
Kelly
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1684
Death: 
1751
Nationality: 
English
Profession or Occupation: 
married Elizabeth Lane 1700
entered the Inner Temple in 1712, but does not appear to have been called to the bar
may have attempted a career as a merchant
by the later 1720s he was writing for a living - translator, playwright, journalist
in 1732–3 he was translating the opening volume of Rapin's history of England in fifty-three weekly numbers
married Mary Boucher 1735
anti-Walpole polemicist until 1741
turned to the expanding market for prose fiction 1741
Politics: 
Tory
Milieux: 
Playwriting; Tory/Jacobite satire and political commentary
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
was one of the early contributors to Henry Baker's Universal Spectator (1728–46), writing at least twenty-four leaders in 1729–30 and later receiving credit for the collected reprint of 1747.
Kelly was paid a guinea a week to revive the seditious newspaper Fog's Weekly Journal 1737
Summing Up: 

Kelly was born in Jamaica to a planter and merchant who became provost marshal of Jamaica. His play ‘The Islanders, or, Mad Orphan’ reflects Kelly's unsuccessful efforts to retrieve his estate from a group of London merchants alleged to have conspired with his father's West Indian executors (including Beckford himself) to defraud him of £30,000. He returned to Jamaica for a time and was fruitlessly embroiled in chancery proceedings until 1718. Thereafter his finances were permanently rocky, and he spent at least two periods in the Fleet, once in 1727–8, and again in 1738–9.

Keck [née Hamilton], Lady Susanna [Susan]

First Name: 
Lady Susanna [Susan]
Last Name: 
Keck [née Hamilton]
Sex: 
Female
Baptism: 
1706
Death: 
1755
Nationality: 
English
Education: 
educated at home
Profession or Occupation: 
daughter of James Hamilton, fourth duke of Hamilton and first duke of Brandon (1658–1712)
married the whig squire of Great Tew, Oxfordshire, Anthony Tracy Keck 1736 (a gentry family, so a step down the social ladder for Susan)
political manager for whig elections, 1754
Politics: 
Whig
Milieux: 
Whig panegyric
Summing Up: 

From an aristocratic family, Lady Susanna was a staunch, lifelong whig and fervent anti-Jacobite/anti-Tory, taking an active and prominent role in Whig elections and campaigns. In late July 1754 she was implicated in the Rag plot, the new interest's last attempt to smear the old interest with charges of Jacobitism before the election petitions were taken up by parliament.

Jubb, George

First Name: 
George
Last Name: 
Jubb
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1717
Baptism: 
1717
Death: 
1787
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
Anglican
Education: 
educated at Westminster School from 1729
king's scholar at Westminster in 1731
elected to a studentship at Christ Church, Oxford 1735
matriculated Christ Church, Oxford 1735
BA 1739
MA 1742
BD 1748
DD 1780
received the Lambeth degree of DD 1755
Profession or Occupation: 
clergyman
appointed chaplain to Thomas Herring, archbishop of York
presented by Herring to the rectory of Cliffe, near Rochester, Kent, which he held until 1751
exchanged the rectory of Cliffe for that of Chenies in Buckinghamshire 1751
received from Lord Stafford the neighbouring living of Toddington in Bedfordshire 1751
appointed joint registrar of the prerogative court of Canterbury 1754, and from 1774 was the sole occupant of this sinecure, which brought him about £600 per annum
was made archdeacon of Middlesex in 1779-1781
appointed to the prebend of Sneating in St Paul's Cathedral in September in 1781
appointed chancellor of York Minster 1781
chosen regius professor of Hebrew and canon of Christ Church on 25 March 1780
married Mrs Mason 1775-1782
married Mrs Anne Middleton 1784
Milieux: 
Clerical religious writing; university wit and latinity
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
A poem by him in hexameters is included in the Oxford verses on the death of Queen Caroline in 1738
A Latin ode, dated 1752, addressed by him to Thomas Herring on his marriage to the daughter of Sir John Torriano, appeared in the Gentleman's Magazine
Summing Up: 

Jubb was a clergyman who wrote occasional verse, some in Latin, published in an Oxford miscellany and GM. His wife was bequeathed an annuity of £350 in Jubb's will.

Jortin, John

First Name: 
John
Last Name: 
Jortin
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1698
Death: 
1770
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
Anglican
Education: 
educated at Charterhouse School
admitted a pensioner at Jesus College, Cambridge, on 16 May 1715
BA 1719
elected fellow of Jesus College on 9 October 1721
MA 1722
Herring conferred a Lambeth degree of DD on him in 1755
Profession or Occupation: 
moderator to the university 1722
taxator to the university 1723
ordained deacon by Bishop Kennett on 22 September 1723
priest 1724
presented to the college living of Swavesey, Cambridgeshire, which he held with his fellowship (1726-8)
married Ann Chibnall 1728
Having resigned his living on 1 February 1731 Jortin was reader and preacher at a chapel of ease in New Street (1731-1747)
Zachary Pearce, rector of St Martin-in-the-Fields, secured him the preachership at a chapel of ease in Oxenden Street 1747-1760
presented to the living of Eastwell, in Kent, in 1737, which he was quickly obliged to resign on grounds of ill health
Thomas Herring, archbishop of Canterburyprocured the Boyle lectureship for Jortin from the earl of Burlington in 1749
Herring presented him to the rectory of St Dunstan-in-the-East in 1751
was appointed chaplain to his friend Thomas Osbaldeston, bishop of London, on 10 March 1762
received the prebendal stall of Harleston, in St Paul's Cathedral, and the vicarage of Kensington, which he held with St Dunstan's
was made archdeacon of London in April 1764
acted as an assistant to Warburton at Lincoln's Inn between 1747 and 1750
Milieux: 
Clerical religious writing; university wit and latinity
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
his letter Concerning the Music of the Ancients, which was included in Charles Avison's Essay on Musical Expression (1753)
his own critical remarks on Virgil appeared in Donaldson's Miscellanea Virgiliana in 1825.
Summing Up: 

It was as an undergraduate at Jesus that he was given his first literary commission: his tutor, Styan Thirlby, had him produce a translation of Eustathius for the notes to Pope's translation of Homer. Jortin was a clergyman who held a number of preferments, but his primary interest was in writing. He published some Latin verse and a number of religious tracts which critiqued Roman Catholicism and offered the most significant Anglican ecclesiastical history of the eighteenth century.

Jones, Dafydd, o Drefriw

First Name: 
Dafydd, o Drefriw
Last Name: 
Jones
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1703
Death: 
1785
Nationality: 
Welsh
Education: 
unknown, but was a skilled copyist and could write English
Profession or Occupation: 
married Gwen, daughter of Richard ap Rhys
verger
charity school teacher
miller
parish constable
assessor
rate collector
editor/publisher
in 1775 he borrowed money to buy Morris's old press, became a printer–publisher
Milieux: 
celtic bard tradition; working-class poet
Coteries: 
Lewis Morris
Richard Morris
Evan Evans
Summing Up: 

In his own work and interests he represents many of the Welsh cultural activities of his day, as a poet, supporter of eisteddfodau, publisher, and itinerant bookseller, friendly with many of the leading literary figures of the time. Jones published a few ballads (1723–7), poems in chapbooks, ‘carols’ on topical and religious themes in the popular alliterative free-verse style, and other occasional verse, dedicatory poems in books, and elegies in the traditional strict-verse metres.

Jones, Dafydd

First Name: 
Dafydd
Last Name: 
Jones
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1711
Death: 
1777
Nationality: 
Welsh
Religion: 
converted to the Crug-y-bar dissenting church
Profession or Occupation: 
farmer and drover
married Ann Jones of Llanddewibrefi (d. 1748)
married Miss Price of Llanwrda
hymn writer
Milieux: 
Clerical religious writing; celtic bard tradition
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
translations of the psalms and hymns of Isaac Watts appeared in Salmau Dafydd (1753), Caniadau dwyfol i blant (1771), and Hymnau a chaniadau ysbrydol (1775)
Summing Up: 

He was known as a folk poet before his conversion. By the request of some dissenting ministers, he translated the psalms and hymns of Isaac Watts. He also translated verses by Joseph Hart, John Cennick, Philip Doddridge, and Charles Wesley. His translations, adaptations, and original hymns proved popular. His rhyming and selection of metres in his hymns often reveal his origins as a country versifier. 

Jones, Samuel

First Name: 
Samuel
Last Name: 
Jones
Sex: 
Male
Death: 
1732
Nationality: 
English
Profession or Occupation: 
clerk
(1709-1731) queen's searcher in the custom house of Whitby
Milieux: 
working-class poet (?)
Summing Up: 

Jones was a poet with a relatively small output, but Jones's writings were much commended in his day. He was a clerk and "searcher" and poet. Little else is known about him.

Jones, Rhys

First Name: 
Rhys
Last Name: 
Jones
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1713
Death: 
1801
Nationality: 
Welsh
Education: 
was educated at Dolgellau and Shrewsbury
Profession or Occupation: 
His proposed legal career was abandoned upon the death of his father in 1731
returned to the family estate
literary editor
Milieux: 
celtic bard tradition
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
nine poems appeared in Huw Jones of Llangwm's Dewisol ganiadau yr oes hon (1759)
Summing Up: 

The DNB explains that Jones composed a number of elegies and eulogies to his county's gentry, beginning in the 1730s with an elegy to the poet and almanac publisher Siôn Rhydderch (d. 1735) and continuing for the next thirty years. He was a master of the techniques of the learned strict metre poets and that he was well versed in their style and subject matter. Rhys copied seventy or so of his poems about 1764, and he presented the collection to his friend and neighbour William Vaughan, of Corsygedol, whom he addressed in several poems.

Jones, Mary

First Name: 
Mary
Last Name: 
Jones
Sex: 
Female
Birth: 
1707
Death: 
1778
Nationality: 
English
Education: 
learned French and Italian
Profession or Occupation: 
may have spent some years as a governess
Milieux: 
Domestic/coterie MS circulation
Coteries: 
Martha Lovelace
Mrs Charlotte Clayton (Lady Sundon)
Samuel Johnson
Thomas Warton
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
Sixteen poems appeared in Poems by Eminent Ladies in 1755.
extracts from her Miscellanies were published in the London Magazine throughout 1752
Summing Up: 

Jones was a poet who lived modestly with her brother but made wealthy friends with an aristocratic circle including two women of Queen Caroline's household: Martha Lovelace and Mrs Charlotte Clayton. She also follows the Domestic/coterie MS circulation pattern. Her Miscellanies in Prose and Verse claims that she began writing verses ‘at a very early age’ with no view to publication.

Jones, Hugh

First Name: 
Hugh
Last Name: 
Jones
Sex: 
Male
Death: 
1782
Nationality: 
Welsh
Education: 
unknown
Profession or Occupation: 
ballad writer
Milieux: 
celtic bard tradition
Coteries: 
Cymmrodorion Society
Lewis Morris
Summing Up: 

Ballad writing seems to have been Jones's primary occupation, though little is known about his origins. He was one of the most prolific ballad writers in eighteenth-century Wales, and 100 or so of his ballads survive. These are based on traditional themes, and were composed mainly between 1749 and 1780. His literary output includes five interludes. He would have received payment for his works, and he also profited by independently printing and selling his interludes throughout north Wales. He was imprisoned on two occasions, once, it seems, for non-payment of a printing debt.

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