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Leapor, Mary

First Name: 
Mary
Last Name: 
Leapor
Sex: 
Female
Birth: 
1722
Death: 
1746
Nationality: 
English
Education: 
probably attended the free school in Brackley, her only formal education
Profession or Occupation: 
father was a gardener
kitchen maid to Susanna Jennens at Weston Hall in her adolescence
took up a similar position in a gentleman's family apparently at Edgcote House, dismissed in 1745
Milieux: 
Working-class poet; domestic/coterie MS circulation
Patrons: 
her employer Susanna Jennens was the Parthenissa of Leapor's poetry
Coteries: 
Bridget Freemantle (1698–1779), who suggested a subscription edition of Leapor's unpublished verse and tried to interest the London stage in a tragedy she had composed
Summing Up: 

Leapor was a working-class poet who often shirked her duties as a maid to write poetry, largely in the style of Pope. "She was said by her father to have begun writing verse at about ten or eleven years old, a habit her parents tried unsuccessfully to discourage" (DNB). Her friend Bridget Freemantle suggested a subscription edition of Leapor's unpublished verse and tried to interest the London stage in a tragedy she had composed, but Leapor died from measles before these plans could come to fruition.

Lauder, William

First Name: 
William
Last Name: 
Lauder
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1710
Death: 
1771
Nationality: 
Scots
Education: 
Edinburgh University
Profession or Occupation: 
private teacher of Latin
unsuccessfully applied for the professorship of humanity at Edinburgh 1734
unsuccessfully applied for the keepership of the university library
the heads of the university awarded him a testimonial on 22 May 1734 and he taught his private school and at the university
narrowly failed in his application to become one of the masters of the high school in Edinburgh 1739
In 1742 Lauder applied for the rectorship of Dundee grammar school, supported by the Edinburgh professors Peter Cumming and Colin McLaurin
scholar and literary forger
later in life he emigrated to Barbados where he taught at a grammar school in Bridgetown
ran a huckster's shop, in which he was helped by a slave woman he had bought
Politics: 
Jacobite sympathies
Milieux: 
University wit and Latinity; writing for London booksellers
Patrons: 
Lauder sent his work on Milton and plagiarism to the secretary of the Young Pretender (Charles Edward Stuart), thinking that this discovery would be of serious propaganda use for the Jacobite cause and asking for money
Samuel Johnson often wrote on Lauder's behalf but Lauder quickly fell out of favor with him
Coteries: 
William King
Samuel Johnson
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
wrote a series of articles in the Gentleman's Magazine (January–August 1747)
Summing Up: 

Lauder seems to have been a poor (in the monetary sense of the word, at least) scholar, and he held some teaching posts.

Lampe, John Frederick

First Name: 
John Frederick
Last Name: 
Lampe
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1702
Death: 
1751
Nationality: 
German
Education: 
matriculated as a law student at the university in Helmstädt 1718
some connection to St Catherine's School in Brunswick
Profession or Occupation: 
became a bassoon player in the opera band in London 1725
composer
wrote music in 1732, as part of a concerted English opera ‘revival’
For the 1733–4 season he was employed at Drury Lane
Theatre politics meant Lampe wrote little theatrical music from 1734 to 1737, and he instead completed his thorough-bass treatise
returned to the Haymarket Theatre 1737
married Isabella Young 1737
Lampe, Isabella, and a small company went to Dublin at Thomas Sheridan's invitation 1748
Lampe moved to Edinburgh for a similar engagement at the Canongate Theatre 1750
Milieux: 
Playwriting
Coteries: 
Henry Carey
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
songs in British Melody (1739)
songs in The Musical Entertainer (1737–40)
Summing Up: 

Lampe was a composer and bassoonist who wrote songs, original ballads, a pantomine, and he arranged music for other poets and playwrights, including Carey's Amelia, Thomas Lediard's masque-like Britannia, John Gay's Dione, and Henry Fielding's Tragedy of Tragedies. He worked primarily in a satirical and comical vein for various theatres in London, Dublin, and Edinburgh.

Knight [née St John], Henrietta [a.k.a. Lady Luxborough]

First Name: 
Henrietta
Last Name: 
Knight [née St John]
Sex: 
Female
Birth: 
1699
Death: 
1756
Nationality: 
English
Profession or Occupation: 
poet
letter writer
married Robert Knight (1702–1772), later Baron Luxborough 1727-1736
she and her husband separated after her set of affairs; She was obliged to live on £500 a year at Barrells, Ullenhall, an isolated Knight estate
Milieux: 
Domestic/coterie MS circulation
Coteries: 
William Shenstone (1714–1763) of The Leasowes, Worcestershire
Richard Jago (1715–1781)
William Somervile (1675–1742)
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
Dodsley's Collection of Poems by Several Hands 1775
Summing Up: 

Isolated in the English countryside after her scandalous affair, she wrote many letters, especially to her friend William Shenstone, the duchess of Somerset, and her half-brother Bolingbroke. She and her friends formed the ‘Warwickshire coterie’; she was known in their literary circle as Asteria. She lived on £500 a year and created a ferme ornée. From about 1750 she was in severe financial difficulties. Her poetry was published in Dodsley's Collection (1775), passed along to Dodsley by Shenstone.

Kirkpatrick [Kilpatrick], James

First Name: 
James
Last Name: 
Kirkpatrick [Kilpatrick]
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1696
Death: 
1770
Nationality: 
Irish
Education: 
unknown
MD, 1740s
Profession or Occupation: 
physician
Milieux: 
University wit and Latinity; Learned/scientific poetry
Summing Up: 

Little is known about Kirkpatrick, but as a young man he sailed to America and practised in Charlestown, South Carolina before later returning to Britain in the early 1740s. A physician, he was a respected authority on inoculation and engaged in a number of pamphlet debates (most notably with Dr. Thomas Dale) in his characteristic long-winded style. He had literary aspirations that didn't seem to come to much; he published "a volume of extremely bad poetry" (with his usual long preface and dedication) written during his original voyage to America.

King, William

First Name: 
William
Last Name: 
King
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1685
Death: 
1763
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
Anglican
Education: 
attended the free school in Salisbury
entered Balliol College, Oxford 1701
admitted a fellow commoner in June 1709
BCL 1709
DCL 1715
Profession or Occupation: 
married his cousin Henrietta Maria Wither 1709
called to the bar at Gray's Inn on 12 July 1712, but never sought practice; retained rights of residence in the Temple until 1747
supported by a modest patrimony he devoted himself to scholarship, literature, and politics
1714-1722 he acted as secretary successively to Jacobites James Butler, second duke of Ormond, and Ormond's brother Charles Butler, second earl of Arran
was installed as principal of St Mary Hall, Oxford for 44 years
orator and political writer
Politics: 
Jacobite sympathies
Milieux: 
Tory/Jacobite satire and political commentary; University wit/Latinity
Coteries: 
Jonathan Swift
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
wrote regularly for the opposition paper Common Sense, or, The Englishman's Journal
Miltonis epistola ad Pollionem reprinted in Edward Popham's Selecta poemata Anglorum Latina (1774)
Summing Up: 

Supported by a modest patrimony, King devoted himself to scholarship, literature, and politics. He was embroiled in a lawsuit for a number of years that cost him a lot of money in legal fees. He wrote a lot of Latin poetry, some of which he translated in English himself. Much of his prose and poetic works were political satires, some in Latin verse, for the Tory/Jacobite cause before he became increasingly disillusioned with the Stuart cause in 1761. He was a good friend of J. Swift before a fallout. He had a solid reputation for oratory and writing.

Kimber, Edward

First Name: 
Edward
Last Name: 
Kimber
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1719
Death: 
1769
Nationality: 
English
Education: 
no evidence of formal education
apprentice to father, editor of the London Magazine beginning 1732
Profession or Occupation: 
married Susanna Anne Lunn 1744
writer
editor of London Magazine 1755
Milieux: 
Writing for London booksellers
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
wrote poetry and travel writing for the London Magazine in 1734; much of his work was published anonymously or pseudonymously
the Universal Magazine (1750)
the Westminster Journal (1751)
edited The Evening advertiser 1754-58
Summing Up: 

Kimber seems to have successfully made writing his primary career, though SJ writes that he died ‘a victim, in the Meridian of his Life, to his indefatigable Toils in the Republic of Letters’ . He was editor of London Magazine, to which he contributed poems and travel writing. He also wrote novels which garnered considerable success. Much of his work, however, was published anonymously or pseudonymously.

Ker, John

First Name: 
John
Last Name: 
Ker
Sex: 
Male
Death: 
1741
Nationality: 
Scots
Profession or Occupation: 
schoolmaster at Crieff, Perthshire
1713 became a master at the Royal High School, Edinburgh
1717 Ker became professor of Greek at King's College, Aberdeen
succeeded Adam Watt as professor of Latin at Edinburgh University 1734
Politics: 
Jacobite sympathies
Milieux: 
University wit and Latinity
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
Latin verse in an anthology, Poetarum Scotorum musae sacrae, edited by William Lauder
Summing Up: 

Ker was a Scots Latin poet and academic who wrote Latin memorial verses, including some on the death of Archibald Pitcairne (1652–1713) and Latin lyricist Sir William Scott of Thirlestane (1624?–1725). He was instrumental in reviving exact Latin scholarship in Scotland.

Kennicott, Benjamin

First Name: 
Benjamin
Last Name: 
Kennicott
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1718
Death: 
1783
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
Anglican
Education: 
educated at the town's grammar school for seven years, as a foundation boy
Subscriptions were opened to finance Kennicott's studies at Oxford
through the Courtenays of Powderham, Ralph Allen of Bath, and the Revd William Daddo, master of Blundells's School at Tiverton, he matriculated as a servitor from Wadham College, Oxford, on 6 March 1744
Pigott exhibitioner in 1744 and 1745
Hody (Hebrew) exhibitioner from 1745 to 1747
Bible clerk from 3 May 1746
BA 1747
was duly elected to a fellowship, which he held until 1771
MA 1750
BD 1761
DD 1761
elected FRS in 1764
Profession or Occupation: 
master of the blue coat, or charity, school of Totnes
clergyman--Whitehall preacher in 1753
vicar of Culham, Oxfordshire, from 21 September 1753 to 1783
chaplain to Bishop Robert Lowth of Oxford, in 1766
Radcliffe librarian at Oxford from 27 November 1767-83
appointed to a canonry at Westminster Abbey but soon resigned it for the fourth stall at Christ Church, Oxford 1770
married Ann 1771
1771 to 1781 Kennicott held the vicarage of Menheniot, Cornwall, which was given to him as a fellow of Exeter College by the dean and chapter of Exeter on the recommendation of Bishop Lowth
member of the Royal Society of Science at Göttingen, the Theodore-Palatine academy at Mannheim, and the Royal Academy of Inscriptions at Paris
Hebrew biblical scholar 1751
Politics: 
Whig
Milieux: 
clerical religious writing
Patrons: 
Robert Lowth
Thomas Secker
duc de Nivernois (a former French ambassador to the court of St James)
the stadholder of the Netherlands made an annual donation of 30 guineas to his scholarly endeavors
Summing Up: 

While a master of the blue coat, or charity, school of Totnes, he attracted notice by some short poems, particularly ‘On the Recovery of the Hon. Mrs. Eliz. Courtenay from her Late Dangerous Illness’, printed in 1743 and 1747. He benefited from Whig patronage. He was a typical clergyman with a number of preferments, but was also a successful biblical scholar. Kennicott's scholarly endeavours attracted support in Britain and beyond. In England subscriptions amounted to £9119 7s. 6d.; he also had a high number of ranking patrons who supported him financially.

Kelsall, John

First Name: 
John
Last Name: 
Kelsall
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1683
Death: 
1743
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
Quaker
Education: 
1687–9 Kelsall was locally educated
Abbeystead School in 1690
Profession or Occupation: 
briefly taught at a Friends' school at Yelland 1700
Penketh School 1700-1701
taught at Dolobran Friends' school 1701
became a regular representative to the London yearly meeting 1704
married Susannah 1711
was offered the position of clerk at the Dolgyn ironworks 1713 but philosophical differences led him to be dismissed in 1719
was appointed in April 1720 to a similar position at Dolobran by Charles Lloyd
After Lloyd was declared bankrupt Kelsall returned as clerk at the Dolgyn furnace until the works closed in 1734
taught at Welshpool 1735
in an impoverished condition, he was forced to seek employment as a teacher in Cork 1735
taught in Chester before moving to Boughton in January 1740
sought work wherever he could find it 1740-3
Milieux: 
Clerical religious writing; Domestic/coterie MS circulation
Summing Up: 

Kelsall was often impoverished and seemed to bounce around from job to job in the teaching or industrial sectors. A Quaker, he lived in the Dolobran meeting-house 1713 but suffered financial difficulties as a result of lowered enrollment and he was forced to sell his stock and equipment. His poor health compounded his fall into poverty. He wrote prolifically in diaries, had a sizeable correspondence, and compiled two volumes of unpublished poetry.

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