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Lyttelton, George, first Baron Lyttelton

First Name: 
George
Last Name: 
Lyttelton
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1709
Death: 
1773
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
devout Christian by 1747
Education: 
Eton College
Christ Church, Oxford, matriculated 1726; did not take a degree
Profession or Occupation: 
politician--opposition MP
writer
returned for the Pitt family borough, Okehampton in Devon, in the by-election 1735
appointed Frederick Prince of Wales's equerry 1735
appointed Frederick Prince of Wales's secretary 1737
Lyttelton unsuccessfully challenged his tory rival Edmund Lechmere for a seat in the general election of 1741
appointed a lord of the Treasury in the new broad-bottom administration in December 1744 and was subsequently dismissed from Frederick's household
succeeded to the baronetcy upon the death of his father in 1751 and took over the running of Hagley Hall
On Henry Pelham's death in March 1754 Lyttelton resigned his seat on the Treasury board
accepted the post of cofferer in the duke of Newcastle's administration 1754
Chancellor of the Exchequer in the room of Legge 1755
When Newcastle resigned in November 1756 in the face of popular opposition, Lyttelton retired from office
created Baron Lyttelton of Frankley 1756
married Lucy Fortescue (1717/18–1747) 1742-47 (early death)
married Elizabeth (1716–1795), the daughter of Sir Robert Rich, fourth baronet (1685–1768) 1749; unhappy marriage, they separated 1759
undertook an ambitious gardening programme which would make Hagley Park one of the most admired landscape gardens of the eighteenth century 1751
literary patron
accession to the House of Lords in November 1756
during the years of political controversy and instability which marked the eight successive ministries between 1757 and 1770 he declined to take office when offered to him
refused the offer of the Treasury made by the duke of Cumberland 1765
refused Cumberland's offer of a cabinet seat in the new Rockingham administration
Politics: 
patriot opposition to Walpole and Whigs by 1735; became a "staunch ministerialist" by 1747
Milieux: 
Whig satire/political writing
Coteries: 
Cobham's Cubs/the Boy Patriots: Lyttelton, Thomas Pitt, William Pitt, and Richard Grenville and George Grenville (‘the cousinhood’), as well as Viscount Cornbury and William Murray
Frederick, prince of Wales
Edward Moore
Gilbert West
alexander pope
James Thomson
Henry Fielding
Richard Glover
David Mallet
James Hammond
William Shenstone
Edward Moore
Voltaire
Elizabeth Montagu
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
recommendation of Glover's patriot epic Leonidas published in the opposition journal Common Sense
contributed to one of the most important opposition journals, Common Sense, or, The Englishman's Journal, started in February 1737
Summing Up: 

Lyttelton was a prominent politician for the whig opposition and the group the Cobham circle. Though he began his published career as a poet, as a writer himself Lyttelton also contributed substantially to the opposition campaign. Lyttelton was close to Frederick Prince of Wales, and Lyttelton was widely perceived as the ‘Maecenas’ who brought deserving poets to his royal notice.

Lowth, Robert

First Name: 
Robert
Last Name: 
Lowth
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1710
Death: 
1787
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
Anglican
Education: 
attended Winchester College, as a scholar, from November 1721 until September 1729
matriculated as a commoner at St John's College, Oxford, on 26 March 1729
admitted as a scholar at New College in January 1730
BA 1733
MA 1737
fellow of New College
DD 1754 by diploma at University of Oxford
Profession or Occupation: 
elected professor of poetry at Oxford 1741; reelected 1746, served a total of 10 years
ordained deacon by Bishop Thomas Secker 1741
priest 1742
Bishop Benjamin Hoadly collated him to the rectory of Ovington, Hampshire 1744
promoted to archdeacon of Winchester 1750
added rectory of East Woodhay to his preferments 1753
married Mary (d. 1803), daughter and heir of Laurence Jackson of Christchurch, Hampshire, in the process securing substantial property and a considerable fortune 1752
appointed as chaplain to William Cavendish, then marquess of Hartington, who was appointed lord lieutenant of Ireland in 1755
granted the freedom of Limerick in June 1755
declined the office of the bishop of Limerick
transferred to him a prebendal stall at Durham
granted the valuable living of Sedgefield ~1755
appointed a royal chaplain on 18 August 1757
considered a candidate to be warden of Winchester College in 1764
fellow of both the Royal Society of London and that of Göttingen 1765
consecrated bishop of St David's 1766
translated to the see of Oxford 1766
1777 he was nominated bishop of London
made dean of the Chapel Royal, was sworn of the privy council
from 1786 was a member of the committee for trade and plantations
governor of the Charterhouse
trustee of the British Museum
declined the offer of the primacy upon the archbishop of Canterbury's death 1783
Politics: 
Whig
Milieux: 
Clerical religious writing; university wit and latinity
Patrons: 
Bishop Hoadly
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
published Latin verses in several collections of poetry from Oxford
published Latin verses in GM
Summing Up: 

Lowth made a name for himself as a very young man through his composition of verses in both English and Latin. He began by writing pious stanzas at age 14, and his career as a poet developed at Oxford, where he wrote Latin verses. Yet it was Lowth's skill as a critic, not a writer, of verse that would win him genuine and widespread fame. While professor of poetry at Oxford, Lowth delivered the thirty-four Praelectiones de sacra poesi Hebraeorum that were to make his name.

Loveling, Benjamin

First Name: 
Benjamin
Last Name: 
Loveling
Sex: 
Male
Baptism: 
1711
Nationality: 
English
Education: 
educated at Winchester College (1722?–1727)
matriculated as a commoner at Trinity College, Oxford 1728; left without a degree
Profession or Occupation: 
unknown
poet
Milieux: 
University wit and Latinity; libertine wit
Coteries: 
Thomas Gilbert
Summing Up: 

Evidently Loveling lived a very licentious lifestyle at Oxford and London, which is reflected in his poetry collection Latin and English Poems. At one point he fled London, perhaps for avoiding imprisonment for debt. He was quite skilled in Latin versification despite his excessive alcohol consumption. DNB states he wrote a creative translation in Imitation of Persius' First Satire (1741) but I can't find it in ESTC.

Lockman, John

First Name: 
John
Last Name: 
Lockman
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1698
Death: 
1771
Nationality: 
English
Education: 
unknown
likely private study
Profession or Occupation: 
married Mary Boucher 1725
author
translator
appointed secretary to the council of the Free British Fishery 1750
Politics: 
Whig
Milieux: 
Whig panegyric
Summing Up: 

Lockman was a prolific and much-acclaimed translator; It was said, perhaps with some exaggeration, that Lockman translated ‘with general accuracy, more books for half a century together than any man of his time’ (GM, 314). He translated works of the marquise de Lambert, La Fontaine, Desfontaines, Le Sage, Marivaux, and King Stanislaus, as well as three substantial volumes of French travel writing. His Q and A style histories were extremely popular. He also helped compile a dictionary.

Locker, John

First Name: 
John
Last Name: 
Locker
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1693
Death: 
1760
Nationality: 
English
Education: 
admitted to the Merchant Taylors' School, London, from the Mercers' School 1707
matriculated at Merton College, Oxford 1711-1713
entered Gray's Inn 1719
called to the bar in 1724
Profession or Occupation: 
barrister
commissioner of bankruptcy
clerk of the Leathersellers' Company 1719
clerk of the Clockmakers' Company 1740
entered into membership of the Society of Antiquaries of London 1737
married Elizabeth (d. 1759), the eldest daughter of Edward Stillingfleet
Coteries: 
printer William Bowyer
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
some poems in The Constellation: Poems on Several Occasions (1715), a miscellany of short pastorals, satires, and odes, and a translation of Virgil's first eclogue
Summing Up: 

Locker was a barrister who was also known as a man of literature. Some of his poems were published in a miscellany by Mr. Bland. He translated into English part of Voltaire's history of Charles XII and was renowned for his skill in modern Greek. His most important achievement was the work he undertook with Robert Stephens, historiographer royal, on the manuscript letters of Sir Francis Bacon.

Littleton, Edward

First Name: 
Edward
Last Name: 
Littleton
Sex: 
Male
Baptism: 
1698
Death: 
1733
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
Anglican
Education: 
educated upon the royal foundation at Eton College under Dr Snape
elected to a scholarship at King's College, Cambridge 1717
BA 1721
MA 1724
LLD 1728
Profession or Occupation: 
clergyman
poet
appointed an assistant master at Eton 1720
ordained deacon in April 1724
ordained priest 1724
elected a fellow of Eton 1726
presented to the vicarage of Mapledurham, Oxfordshire 1726
married Frances, daughter of Barnham Goode
appointed one of the king's chaplains 1730
Milieux: 
Clerical religious writing
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
a humorous poem entitled ‘A Letter from Cambridge to Master Henry Archer, a Young Gentleman at Eton School’ appeared posthumously in GM 1738.
His more celebrated poem ‘On a Spider’ appeared in James Ralph's collection of Miscellaneous Poems (1729)
‘A Letter from Cambridge to Master Henry Archer, a Young Gentleman at Eton School’ and 'On a Spider' were reprinted in Robert Dodsley's popular anthology, A Collection of Poems (1748–58)
Summing Up: 

Littleton was a clergyman who wrote a humorous poem as an undergraduate, and a pastoral elegy on the death of Ralph Banks, a scholar of King's College, among other poems. Some of his works were printed in GM or miscellanies (such as Dodsley's) and many were published posthumously after he died of a fever. His sermons were also published posthumously for the benefit of his widow and children.

Lillo, George

First Name: 
George
Last Name: 
Lillo
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1693
Death: 
1739
Nationality: 
English
Religion: 
Dissenter/Calvinist; likely converted to Anglicanism
Profession or Occupation: 
goldsmith or jeweller
playwright beginning 1730
Politics: 
sympathized with constitutional monarchy as propounded by the ‘patriot’ opposition to Walpole and the whig establishment
Milieux: 
Playwriting
Patrons: 
Theophilus Cibber
Coteries: 
Henry Fielding
Thomas Davies
John Gray
Summing Up: 

Although Lillo was neither a professional man of the theatre nor at home in literary circles, he was not the naïve artist he is sometimes described as having been. He wrote mostly in verse, but sometimes in prose. Lillo was a playwright who had some wild successes (most notably The London Merchant, which successfully popularized domestic drama), as well as some flops. He enjoyed some royal patronage for some of his works, performing The London Merchant before Queen Caroline and inscribing some of his plays to members of the royal family.

Lewis, Joseph

First Name: 
Joseph
Last Name: 
Lewis
Sex: 
Male
Nationality: 
Welsh?
Education: 
elementary education may have been provided by Sir John Philipps
Profession or Occupation: 
artisan; described in 1754 as ‘an illiterate raw Lad … a mechanic’ and later as ‘a poor ivory-turner’
editor of the Westminster Magazine, under the pseudonym Lancelot Poverty-Struck 1750-1751
married by 1752
poet
Milieux: 
working-class poet
Patrons: 
petitioned David Garrick for money
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
several of his poems in Westminster Magazine 1750–51 under the pseud. Lancelot Poverty-Struck
an acrostic by him praising a Dr Wolf Joseph Yonker, dated 1774 but sent to the Gentleman's Magazine by an anonymous contributor in 1785
Summing Up: 

Lewis's birth and death dates are unkown, but he (fl. 1750–1774). Although he's belated according to our standards, he's a particularly interesting case. Writing under the pseudonym "Lancelot Poverty-Struck," Lewis's poems frequently reflect the vicissitudes of a working man's life.

Lewis, David

First Name: 
David
Last Name: 
Lewis
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1682
Death: 
1760
Nationality: 
Welsh
Education: 
matriculated Jesus College, Oxford 1698
BA 1702
Profession or Occupation: 
became usher or undermaster at Westminster School in London from 1726 to 1732
poet
married Mary (1683/1684–1774), fourth daughter of Newdigate Owsley, a merchant of Leyton, Essex
Milieux: 
Playwriting
Coteries: 
Alexander Pope (his support is acknowledged in Lewis's play Philip of Macedon)
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
contributed verses beginning ‘While malice, Pope, denies thy page’ to Richard Savage's Collection of Pieces on Occasion of ‘The Dunciad’ (1732)
Summing Up: 

Lewis seemed to have gained considerable success as a poet/playwright, though he was also an usher for a time. His first collection of contemporary poetry was well-received and led him to publish a second. These collections included a wide range of poets writing on various topics; Lewis included his own verses too but did not identify them. He was widely respected for his poetry and highly praised by his friend, Alexander Pope.

Lee, Matthew

First Name: 
Matthew
Last Name: 
Lee
Sex: 
Male
Birth: 
1694
Death: 
1755
Nationality: 
English
Education: 
educated at Westminster School 1709-1713
Christ Church, Oxford BA 1717
MA 1720
MB 1722
MD 1726
Profession or Occupation: 
physician
married Sarah Knapp
successfully practiced medicine in Oxford before moving to London in 1730
appointed a candidate of the Royal College of Physicians 1731
became a fellow on 3 April 1732
appointed college censor (1734)
Harveian orator (1736)
became physician to Frederick, prince of Wales 1739
upon his death, donated £140 p.a. for readership in anatomy, University of Oxford, and £1200 for anatomy school
Milieux: 
University wit and Latinity
Periodicals & Misc Contributed To: 
contributed to a book of poems on the death in 1715 of the eminent physician Dr John Radcliffe
Summing Up: 

Lee was a very successful physician, even attending Frederick, Prince of Wales at one point in his career. He wrote occassional verses while at University and published an oration as Harveian orator in 1736. He died wealthy enough to bequeath funds in his will to build an anatomy school at Christ Church, which was completed at a cost of £1200. In addition, Lee left £140 p.a. for a university readership in anatomy (to which appointments are still made).

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